Misc

10 Best Freediving Fins of 2020: Plastic, Propylene, Rubber

Best Freediving Fins

You can dive with any type of gear, but freediving fins have a specific design, and therefore, offer more advantages over other types.

Freediving fins are long and elegant. Their large size means you can easily displace a larger amount of water with a little leg movement and this makes all the difference when you've got a limited oxygen supply.

The problem, however, is the abundance of offers on the market and their variety in style, material, and overall design. This can easily overwhelm someone, especially when it's your first time.

But in this freediving fins review, you'll get a list of the market's top offers and an additional buying guide to help you make the right choice.

You can also read other product reviews of bodyboard fins, scuba gear, dive knife

10 Best Freediving Fins – Review

IMAGE

​PRODUCT

​FEATURES

Cressi Gara 3000 LD

1. Cressi Gara 3000 LD (Best Overall)

  • One-piece high-quality freediving fins
  • Made from propylene and thermoplastic
  • Ideal for longer distances
  • Features thicker foot pockets
Cressi Pluma

2. Cressi Pluma (Best Budget)

  • Lightweight freediving fins
  • Offered at a very attractive price
  • Extra-soft & comfortable foot pockets
  • Blade ribs offer maximum control and thrust
Cressi Gara Professional

3. Cressi Gara Professional (Best Polypropylene Fins)

  • Lightweight polypropylene freediving fins
  • Extra-long blades designed for longer distances
  • Super-soft & comfortable foot pockets
Cressi Clio

4. Cressi Clio (Best for Beginner)

  • Very popular Cressi diving fins
  • Ideal for beginners and for practicing
  • Comfortable soft rubber foot pocket
  • Comes in black, blue, and yellow versions
Cressi Gara 2000HF

5. Cressi Gara 2000HF (Best Triple-material Fins)

  • First fin to combine three materials
  • Designed for top performance & control
  • Lightweight with maximum thrust
Omer P7139

6. Omer P7139 (22° Fixed blade Fins)

  • Features a 22° foot pocket to blade angle
  • Available in many sizes
  • Thermo-rubber and polypropylene construction
  • Good and durable construction
Beuchat Mundial

7. Beuchat Mundial (With Technopolymer Blade)

  • One-piece and bi-material construction
  • A thermoplastic and technopolymer combination
  • Includes stabilizers for better control
  • Its fish-tail shape improves efficiency
Mares Razor Pro

8. Mares Razor Pro (With Removable Blades)

  • Freediving fins with interchangeable blades
  • Made from technopolymer
  • Available in black and black grey
  • Also available in eight sizes
Mako Spearguns Freedive

9. Mako Spearguns Freedive (Quality & Affordable)

  • Polypropylene freediving fins
  • Comes at a low and attractive price
  • Features soft and comfortable foot pockets
  • Available in four sizes from 6 to 13
Rob Allen Scorpia

10. Rob Allen Scorpia (With Water Channels)

  • Beautifully designed plastic blades
  • Channels provide optimal movement
  • Soft foot pockets made from rubber

PRODUCT

1. Cressi Gara 3000 LD

(Best Overall)

Cressi Gara 3000 LD
  • One-piece high-quality freediving fins
  • Made from propylene and thermoplastic
  • Ideal for longer distances
  • Features thicker foot pockets

2. Cressi Pluma

(Best Budget)

Cressi Pluma
  • Lightweight freediving fins
  • Offered at a very attractive price
  • Extra-soft & comfortable foot pockets
  • Blade ribs offer maximum control and thrust

3. Cressi Gara Professional

(Best Polypropylene Fins)

Cressi Gara Professional
  • Lightweight polypropylene freediving fins
  • Extra-long blades designed for longer distances
  • Super-soft & comfortable foot pockets

4. Cressi Clio

(Best for Beginner)

Cressi Clio
  • Very popular Cressi diving fins
  • Ideal for beginners and for practicing
  • Comfortable soft rubber foot pocket
  • Comes in black, blue, and yellow versions

5. Cressi Gara 2000HF

(Best Triple-material Fins)

Cressi Gara 2000HF
  • First fin to combine three materials
  • Designed for top performance & control
  • Lightweight with maximum thrust

6. Omer P7139

(22° Fixed blade Fins)

Omer P7139
  • Features a 22° foot pocket to blade angle
  • Available in many sizes
  • Thermo-rubber and polypropylene construction
  • Good and durable construction

7. Beuchat Mundial

(With Technopolymer Blade)

Beuchat Mundial
  • One-piece and bi-material construction
  • A thermoplastic and technopolymer combination
  • Includes stabilizers for better control
  • Its fish-tail shape improves efficiency

8. Mares Razor Pro

(With Removable Blades)

Mares Razor Pro
  • Freediving fins with interchangeable blades
  • Made from technopolymer
  • Available in black and black grey
  • Also available in eight sizes

9. Mako Spearguns Freedive

(Quality & Affordable)

Mako Spearguns Freedive
  • Polypropylene freediving fins
  • Comes at a low and attractive price
  • Features soft and comfortable foot pockets
  • Available in four sizes from 6 to 13

10. Rob Allen Scorpia

(With Water Channels)

Rob Allen Scorpia
  • Beautifully designed plastic blades
  • Channels provide optimal movement
  • Soft foot pockets made from rubber

1. Cressi Gara 3000 LD – Best Overall Freediving Fins

Cressi Gara 3000 LD

Photo: Cressi

  • Sizes: US 7 - 13
  • Materials: Propylene & thermoplastic
  • Weight: 5.3 pounds

This Cressi Gara 3000 LD is designed for those who want the very best freediving fins at a great price. It features soft but very long blades to produce the softest thrust from the least muscle effort, making it perfect for long-distance diving. Plus, it comes with a carrying bag to make it our best overall freediving fins.

Cressi is a top brand when it comes to diving equipment, and these fins are based on Cressi's already popular Gara 3000 HF, but with improvements, such as the softer materials and the 15% increase in flexibility.

It's also more suitable for diving in cold water because cold water tends to stiffen materials. But these soft blades will guarantee you more flexibility at all times. Each blade is also designed proportionally to the diving fins' foot pocket sizing for comfort and efficiency.

When it comes to price, however, these freediving fins are one of the costliest on this list. But remember that they are Cressi diving fins and that nothing beats them for extended cold-water use.

Pros:

  • One-piece high-quality freediving fins
  • Designed for longer distance diving
  • Each size is designed with proportional blades
  • Features thicker foot pockets

Cons:

  • You can get less costly offers

2. Cressi Pluma – Best Budget Freediving Fins

Cressi Pluma

Photo: Cressi

  • Sizes: 3.5 - 12
  • Materials: Thermo-rubber, polypropylene
  • Weight: 2.7 pounds

Budget shoppers on the search for the best cheap freediving fins may appreciate this set of fins. The Cressi Pluma comes at an attractive price and it's made by molding thermo-rubber and polypropylene at the right places.

This set is also lightweight at just 2.7 pounds, so it's easy to get used to, especially by beginners. Keep in mind that it's not as long as most other freediving fins, but this makes it great for beginners, as well as for snorkeling and even scuba diving.

Its polypropylene blades ensure a powerful and fluid snap every time, while the two side ribs help you maintain better control and turns.

Because of its relatively shorter blade length, you can't go too far with these fins. But they are great for practice, offer comfortable full foot pockets, and the package includes non-slip inserts to help protect your feet.

Pros:

  • Lightweight freediving fins at just 2.7 pounds
  • Comes at a very low and attractive price
  • Features extra-soft thermo-rubber foot pockets
  • Blade ribs offer maximum control and thrust

Cons:

  • It's not ideal for long distances

3. Cressi Gara Professional – Best Polypropylene Freediving Fins

Cressi Gara Professional

Photo: Cressi

  • Sizes: US 7 - 13
  • Materials: Polypropylene
  • Weight: 5.3 pounds

Cressi's Gara Professional freediving fins offer you high quality and performance in one. These fins are designed to produce the maximum power with a minimum of force, thus making it perfect for long-distance diving.

The blades are very long and made from polypropylene for more fluid and longer-lasting kicks. Cressi also takes time in developing the foot pockets with a softer material for more comfort and safety.

You can also use these fins in cold water and for scuba diving. This makes it more versatile and perfect for all skill levels, including beginners and more advanced divers.

You have to keep in mind that having softer blades means less propulsion than fins with stiffer blades. In the long run, though, these fins help you save your energy over longer distances, making their softer designs very much worth it.

Pros:

  • Lightweight polypropylene freediving fins
  • The extra-long blades are good for longer distances
  • Features super-soft foot pockets for comfort
  • The fins deliver maximum power with the least energy

Cons:

  • They are relatively soft and don't accelerate much

4. Cressi Clio – Best Beginner Freediving Fins

Cressi Clio

Photo: Cressi

  • Sizes: US 7 - 11
  • Materials: EVA, thermo-rubber
  • Weight: 2.8 pounds

Designed with beginners in mind, these Cressi Clio diving fins feature ultra-soft and ergonomic foot pockets, making them perfect for divers of all ages and skill levels, including adults and children.

They are also very lightweight at just 2.8 pounds and are available in many colors, including blue, black, and yellow, so  you can select a color to march your outfit.

These fins' blades are made from EVA and this makes them very responsive. So, you can use them to practice many diving forms, including snorkeling and freediving.

What you should keep in mind here, is that these fins don't have a perfect free-diving design, as they are too short and won't conserve much energy. But they are great for learning and practice.

Pros:

  • Very popular diving fins from Cressi
  • Designed for beginners and for practicing
  • Comfortable foot pocket made from soft rubber
  • Available in black, blue, and yellow

Cons:

  • You can find better-designed freediving fins

5. Cressi Gara 2000HF – Best Triple-material Freediving Fins

Cressi Gara 2000HF

Photo: Cressi

  • Sizes: 6.5 - 11.5
  • Materials: Propylene & two elastomers
  • Weight: 4 pounds

This Cressi Gara 200HF is Cressi's most popular freediving fins and with good reason. It's the first set of fins in the world to combine three different materials in its production. Cressi also perfected and patented this technology.

It all starts with a soft elastomer to ergonomically secure the feet and transfer as much of the kick power as possible. Then there's the solid copolymer to harden critical points around the foot pockets and extend down to the blades.

The third material is a very reactive polypropylene, which is both lightweight and delivers maximum thrust with minimum kicks.

One thing that's not so impressive here is the price. But remember that it's a Cressi, and it's even the popular 2000HF that's one of the best spearfishing fins out there.

Pros:

  • First fin to combine three materials
  • Well made with a perfect fitting
  • Offers good control and performance
  • Lightweight but offers maximum thrust

Cons:

  • You can find less expensive options

6. Omer P7139 – 22° Fixed blade Freediving Fins

Omer P7139

Photo: Omer

  • Sizes: US 6 - 14
  • Materials: Thermo rubber, Polypropylene
  • Weight: 6.4 pounds

Most free-diving fins feature a 15 to 17-degree angle between their foot pockets and blades. But these Omer fins feature 22° and this makes them more efficient because of better transfer of power from the feet to the blades.

An additional feature is its low price, which is interesting because these fins are performance fins. You can also remove the blades or interchange them if you want, and for the foot pockets, Omer uses thermo-rubber to guarantee the highest levels of comfort.

These fins are currently offered in black, and this is a bit disappointing because they would be perfect in nice and bright colors.

Pros:

  • Freediving fins with a 22° foot pocket to blade angle
  • Available in a low and attractive price
  • Features thermo-rubber foot pockets
  • Good and durable construction

Cons:

  • It only comes in black

7. Beuchat Mundial – Freediving Fins With Technopolymer Blade

Beuchat Mundial

Photo: Beuchat

  • Sizes: US 6.5 - 12.5
  • Materials: Thermoplastic, technopolymer
  • Weight: 9 pounds

Beuchat's Mundial fins are versatile fins with a bi-material construction for comfort and performance. They are great for both beginners and intermediate freedivers.

The foot pockets come from a thermoplastic elastomer that provides comfort, safety, and correctly transfers power from the feet to the blades. The blades come from a techno polymer to provide the diver with the right amount of flexibility and stiffness.

They also come with stabilizers that combine with these fin's fishtail shape to better guide the water flow and deliver more efficient kicks.

Two issues to consider here is that you can't change the blades and the fins are relatively heavy. Else, they are perfect for anyone who desires to perfect his/her diving skills.

Pros:

  • One-piece fin with bi-material construction
  • Combines thermoplastic with a technopolymer blade
  • Integrated stabilizers for better control
  • The blade features a fish-tail shape for improved efficiency

Cons:

  • You can't change out the blades
  • The fins are on the heavy side

8. Mares Razor Pro – Freediving Fins With Removable Blades

Mares Razor Pro

Photo: Mares Razor

  • Sizes: US 5.5 - 13
  • Materials: Technopolymer
  • Weight: 6 pounds

If you are on a budget but you want fins that are nearly as good as the best carbon fiber freediving fins, then consider an option like these Mares Razor Pro fins.

Mares invested a lot in developing these fins and it paid off. You get interchangeable blades, a v-tip design to prevent slipping sideways, and a variable thickness blade for perfect elasticity and agility.

It's also a relatively lightweight set of fins and Mares offers five sizes to choose from, ranging from US 5.5 to size 13.

Unlike many other freediving fins, however, you must wear this one with 3 mm neoprene socks. But that's a small price to pay for this premium-quality set of fins.

Pros:

  • Features interchangeable blades
  • Available in glack and black grey
  • Includes a V-tip for higher levels of stability
  • Also available in eight sizes

Cons:

  • It must be worn with 3mm neoprene socks

9. Mako Spearguns Freedive – Quality & Affordable Polypropylene Fins

Mako Spearguns Freedive

Photo: Mako Spearguns

  • Sizes: US 6 - 13
  • Materials: Polypropylene
  • Weight: 6 pounds

The Mako Spearguns Freedive package offers you a set of polypropylene fins designed for beginners and offered at a low and attractive price.

One nice thing about this set though, is that it includes most of the features of much costlier brands, but at a cheaper price. For example, soft and comfortable foot pockets, with reinforcements only where necessary.

These fins also feature water channels and a V-tip for better water control, making them highly efficient fins and a great option for those looking to buy the best hammerhead freediving fins.

The only issue is that you can't change the blades because they are mono-fins. They are, however, beginner fins and most beginners don't care or worry about changing blades, at least for the moment.

Pros:

  • Polypropylene freediving fins
  • Comes at a low and attractive price
  • Features soft and comfortable foot pockets
  • Available in four sizes from 6 to 13

Cons:

  • You can't change the blades later on

10. Rob Allen Scorpia – Plastic Freediving Fins With Water Channels

Rob Allen Scorpia

Photo: Rob Allen

  • Sizes: US 3 - 15
  • Materials: Plastic
  • Weight: 10 pounds

Rob Allen's Scorpia fins offer the beginner and intermediate the functionality and practicality of premium fins, but at a more affordable price.

These fins are designed for durability and the foot pockets feature a molded rubber construction to make them perfectly fitting while staying secure and comfortable.

Then, there are the softened blades with water channels for optimum control. Plus the green camo design to fit the rest of your gear and set you apart.

One issue with this offer, however, is the fins' weight, because they are the heaviest fins on this list. The good news though, is that they are only two pounds heavier than the next fins.

Pros:

  • Beautifully made plastic blades
  • Includes channels for optimal movements
  • Features rubber foot pockets
  • Available in seven sizes from size US 3 to 15

Cons:

  • It's the heaviest fins offer on this list

How to Buy the Best Freediving Fins

How to Buy the Best Freediving Fins

Photo: flickr.com

1. Size & Fitting

Freediving depends on perfectly-fitting fins to work, so it's of utmost importance that you first consider how well any pair will fit you before considering other factors. What you want is a foot pocket that feels like an extension of your legs.

If the foot pockets are too small, then they might cramp your feet and cause you some discomfort, which can ruin your entire freediving experience. If they are too big, on the other hand, then the fins won't work as intended. So, you may just end up wasting your energy without really moving.

Also consider wearing neoprene socks, as they can make a slightly bigger set of fins fit snuggly, as well as protect and keep your feet warmer. Remember to check the sock's thickness and then factor it in when going through the fin manufacturer's sizing chart.

2. Construction Materials

You'll find the best freediving fin blades from different materials, such as plastic, fiberglass, and carbon fiber. Each of these materials offers advantages and disadvantages, as you can see below.

Plastic Blades. These are cheap and durable, so they are perfect for beginners. You don't need to take special care of plastic blades, unlike the other types. They do have disadvantages though, and this includes poorer performance and degrading effectiveness with time.

Fiberglass Blades. This material offers efficiency than plastic and it's a good choice for intermediate freedivers. The disadvantages of the best fiberglass freediving fins include a higher price tag and their fragility, which means you always have to take special care of them.

Carbon Fiber Blades. Carbon fiber blades are the most efficient and effective. They are also the most expensive and very fragile. But they are preferred by expert freedivers.

3. Skill Level

Your skill level also helps to determine the perfect set of fins for you. If you're just starting, then plastic mono-fins can do. Else, you may have to choose a more complex combination of materials and design to suit your skill and comfort level.

4. Mono-fins & Modular Fins

Freediving fins either have their foot pockets integrated with the blade, in which case they are called mono-fins, such as these Mako Spearguns fins. Or the blades and foot pockets are separate and referred to as modular fins, such as the Mares Razor Pro fins.

Mono-fins are great for beginners, but most experts go for modular fins for good reasons. First, you can choose a foot pocket from one manufacturer, but use the blades from a different manufacturer of your choice. Secondly, you can begin with affordable plastic fins and later switch up to fiberglass or carbon blades.

5. Performance

Your performance with any particular pair of fins goes beyond its size and construction materials. It also has to do with your body type and the fins' stiffness. In simple terms, you have to suit their stiffness to your body type to get the best results.

If the fins are too soft for your body musculature and abilities, then you'll need extra movement. If it's too hard, then you'll need extra energy to get going. So, you need to consider your build first, then get a pair of matching freediving fins.

For small-bodied divers, soft fins will do. For freedivers with a medium build and some muscle, medium-stiff fins will do, and for bigger divers or those with strong leg muscles, hard fins are the answer.

Conclusion

We've come to the end of this freediving fins review and you've seen the market's top offer with all their great features. Now, it's your turn to make a choice.

For a simple selection with all the right features, we recommend the Cressi Gara 3000 LD fins, which offer thicker foot pockets, proportional blades, and are very helpful for long distances.

If you are on a budget, we recommend the Cressi Pluma fins offer, with its low price, 2.7-pound lightweight, and soft thermo-rubber foot pockets.

Or, you could go for the Omer P7139 freediving fins, if you want performance freediving fins at an attractive price.

Table of Contents
Thanks for letting us know!
Was this page helpful?
Related Reads
Hunting for treasures at the beach or the river can be very rewarding. And underwater metal ...
Hunting with turkey decoys makes your life easier and increases your hunting success each time. The ...
Cabin tents or cabin-style tents stand out from the rest because of their nearly vertical sidewalls. ...
Teepee tents or tipis have that unique look that evokes the wild west in all of us. So, it's ...
A larger tent has many advantages for large groups over smaller tents. So, if you're considering ...
10-person camping tents can save you a lot of stress when camping out with a large group. They take ...
Lately, the popularity of canvas tents is on a spike due to obvious reasons that they are more ...
If you love to camp, but prefer a little class, luxury, or even sheer extravagance, then glamping is ...
Inflatable camping tents are an amazing invention. Spread out the material, pump in some air, and ...